Norwegian (Bokmål) English 

Årsrapport

Norwegian (Bokmål) English 

Work organisation

Our research studies how the work is organised internally in the businesses, and how work is organised between businesses, along with what challenges such complexity represents and means to solve them. We are concerned with how the organisation of work is influenced by the major trends in the workplace such as globalisation, deregulation, technological changes (automation) and economic fluctuations/markets. In addition, we are concerned with how the organisation of the work correlates with and affects factors such as leadership/management, occupational health and safety, work practices, the work environment, efficiency and control. 

Research findings:
  • The traditional divide between manual and non-manual labour still describes highly relevant differences in employees’ autonomy in modern working life, but in addition we find an important dividing line between those who must work closely with employees in other companies and those who do not have such contact. Project: “Socio-Link,” a study of the major suppliers, funded by the Research Council of Norway
     
  • Large workshop companies experience that they must offer working hours arrangements with long free periods in order to attract the best qualified workforce (commuters). The use of a 14/21 scheme (two weeks on, three weeks off) is desired by many, and our findings show that this scheme can work well for both commuters and those living nearby if it is something that is chosen voluntarily. The Project “Multiple working time arrangements in the manufacturing industry,” funded by the NHO Working Environment Fund.
     
  • Autonomy has traditionally been seen as the employees’ possibilities to manage and influence their own work, and this has been and remains a fundamental pillar of the Scandinavian labour market thinking. Our research findings show that employees today have different perceptions of what their autonomy is and what affects it. One feature is that employees do not look at autonomy as only one single individual, but as something that one can have collectively with others. Nor is autonomy perceived as freedom from everything, but rather presupposes known and defined structures one can relate to. Project: “Employee Autonomy at Work,” funded by the Research Council of Norway.